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Living and Surviving Behind Bars: Notes of Incarcerated Women’s Words

Joao Vitor Candido Pimentel1,2,3, Cicero Roberto Pinheiro Grangeiro Junior1,2,3, Gabriel Cabral Alencar dos Santos5, Nelio Barreto Vieira4, Flaviane Cristine Troglio da Silva4 and Modesto Leite Rolim Neto1,2,3,4*

1Federal University of Cariri, Divine Savior Street, 284, Center, Barbalha, Ceara, Brazil

2Scientific Writing Lab (LABESCI), Federal University of Cariri (UFCA), Brazil

3Suicidology Research group, Federal University of Ceara (UFC)/National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq), Brazil

4Post Graduation Program in Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine of ABC, Santo André, São Paulo, Brazil

5Faculty of Medicine, Estácio FMJ, Juazeiro do Norte, Ceara, Brazil

*Corresponding Author:
Modesto Rolim Neto,
Faculty of Medicine, Estácio FMJ
Juazeiro do Norte, Ceará, Brazil
Tel: +55(88)96911385
E-mail: modestorolim@yahoo.com.br

Received date: Sep 29, 2016; Accepted date: Oct 13, 2016; Published date: Oct 17, 2016

Citation: Pimentel JVC, Grangeiro Júnior CRP, Alencar dos Santos GC, et al. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Major Depression. J Neurol Neurosci. 2016, 7:5. doi:10.21767/2171-6625.1000151

 
Visit for more related articles at Journal of Neurology and Neuroscience

Abstract

In September 2015, the Institute for Criminal Policy Research, University of London, showed Brazil presents the fifth biggest population of imprisoned women (37,380) in the world. In this context, Débora Diniz, a Brazilian anthropologist researcher, gave voices to the women imprisoned in a female penitentiary of Brazilian capital, through the book “Cadeia: Relato sobre mulheres” (“Jail: report about women”). Beyond the numbers, the importance of work is in a sensible, accurate and necessary report of the stories of a throng of abandoned human beings who suffer psychologically, for drugs abstinence, aggression and death threats and worrying about their children, what results in depression, bipolar disorder, psychosis, suicide and suicide ideation, among other damages. In this way, the prison shows itself like a machine of abandonment, not capable of transforming, as it should, what especially need the attention of the psychiatry world.

In September 2015, the Institute for Criminal Policy Research, University of London, showed Brazil presents the fifth biggest population of imprisoned women (37,380) in the world. In this context, Débora Diniz, a Brazilian anthropologist researcher, gave voices to the women imprisoned in a female penitentiary of Brazilian capital, through the book “Cadeia: Relato sobre mulheres” (“Jail: report about women”). Beyond the numbers, the importance of work is in a sensible, accurate and necessary report of the stories of a throng of abandoned human beings who suffer psychologically, for drugs abstinence, aggression and death threats and worrying about their children, what results in depression, bipolar disorder, psychosis, suicide and suicide ideation, among other damages. In this way, the prison shows itself like a machine of abandonment, not capable of transforming, as it should, what especially need the attention of the psychiatry world.

Keywords

Jail; Imprisoned women; Psychiatric disorder

Introduction

The most recent “World Female Imprisonment List” [1], published by Institute for Criminal Policy Research, University of London, in September 2015, shows that more than 700,000 women and girls are held in penal institutions throughout the world, either as pre-trial detainees/remand prisoners or having been convicted and sentenced. It also shows that the population of incarcerated female inhabitants has increased sharply: about 50% since the year 2000. According to this list, Brazil presents an alarming data: almost four times the 2000 level of female imprisoned population, reaching the fifth biggest population of imprisoned women (37,380). Débora Diniz, a Brazilian anthropologist researcher, working with the population imprisoned in a female penitentiary of Brazilian capital, in 2014, found that one in four of that prisoners lived in a reformatory in adolescence, many of them had suffered violence, used drugs, stole and roamed the streets. The majority of them was jailed for drugs traffic, generally after their partners [2]. Notwithstanding this, it is essential to ask: Who are the women behind the numbers?

In her book “Cadeia: Relato sobre mulheres” (“Jail: report about women”) [2], September 2015, Diniz addresses these women in a deeper way, forgetting the numbers, but recovering the voices, aiming to perform a unique qualitative view, through the listening, with no questions. The writer shows a throng of 700 abandoned female prisoners through the report of 50 selected stories. Among them, there were pregnant, sick, old or very young, foreign, crazy and leaders that, since the entering, through a process of domestication to the ways of living behind bars, had to learn the typical manner of speaking, the existing hierarchies and the beneficial relationships in order to live and to survive in jail [2].

The researcher Débora Diniz describes the abandonment; the fear and the anxiety about the aggression or death threats; the drug and/or medication abstinence; the worrying about outer relatives, especially children [2]; and, finally, the lack of privacy as marks of the prisonal place, expressions of psychic suffering [3]. The need for care due to an important mental and physical health weakness of these women, previous or increased during their stay in prison, contrasts with a scarce team of health professionals, composed by a psychologist, a social worker and a doctor, who are responsible for full caring the almost 700 imprisoned inmates.

This frame results in or exarcebates previous psychological disorders, as reported: depression, bipolar disorder, psychosis, suicide and suicide ideation [2]. Despite this, the author cites experiences of human resilience too, like friendships, dating, reading and share [4]. An important example of share is when the jailed ones with no visitors and, thus, with no needed goods to receive, acquire these products from other women [2].

Nevertheless, the social reality of Brazil illustrates a wicked analysis from the Government. Ventura, Simas and Larouzé disclose that there are fragilities in criminal and social politics regarding the disparities decrease and the citizenship strengthening of these women [5]. Also, the main purpose of the brazilian prisons became distorted: instead of being a place where one can be resocialized, it is a place where the society “can forget” the human beings living there, making them feel disvalued, angry and abandoned. As Diniz highlighted, the prison is not capable to transform as it should. The system subsists to sustain the vengeance feeling of the society instead to repair the conditions in which the crimes begin. To solve this, it is necessary to improve social and educational politics and to freely debate the action of the Government in themes like drugs, racial inequalities and guns [6].

Although being, as identifies herself, a note taker of others’ words, Diniz could perform a sensible, accurate and necessary report of the actual reality of the imprisoned women. The researcher demonstrates that they are humans that suffer from a great variety of mental disorders and, thus, especially need the attention of the psychiatry world. Moreover, the study shows that prison is an abandonment machine, for which the violence senses are multiple. The women that cross the main gate will never be the same; but the imprisonment is just the end line of a great abandonment rite initiated when each one was born [2].

Instead of an end line, the prison must be the place in which these women are going to consider new ways of living, in order to better cope the situation that led them to such a place. This cannot be conceived with punishment without care, with judgment without real correction or with reclusion without companionship. In this way, new and bigger studies must be performed in order to better understand the exclusion reality before, during and after the imprisonment process to which these women are exposed.

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